Clapperbrook Lane

Clapperbrook Lane was part of an ancient route that was used by travellers who wished to by pass Exeter and the City walls.

Next to Clapperbrook Lane there were traces of Mediaeval strip fields and the Alphington Tithe Map shows these long narrow fields situated between the lane and the Alphin Brook. Rectangular plots are thought to indicate the site of an early settlement and the smaller fields/plots of land marked on the Tithe Map where Clapperbrook Cottage once stood seems to fit the bill.

Clapperbrook Lane was thought to have been named after the clapper bridge that once crossed the Alphin Brook. Previously, the lane had been named Water Lane in a document dated 1817. A document dated 1842 records the lane as Watery Lane but the 1841 Census states it was Clapperbrook Lane.

The lane that once led off Clapperbrook Lane and ran between the allotments and the land adjoining Balsam Cottage was marked as Clay Lane on an early map of Alphington (possibly dated 1700s to early/mid 1800s). A map dated 1904 names the lane as Water Lane and a ford is marked near the end of the lane close to Mutton Lane.

One of the old fields alongside the Alphin Brook was named Deptford. Deptford was possibly derived from the Anglo-Saxon word for deep ford. I think we could assume that a ford on the brook was situated here at one time enabling people to cross the brook before the clapper bridge was in place.


Clapperbrook Lane
Copyright © Rowena Kirkpatrick

On the older Alphington map a large house and grounds are drawn, roughly on the corner of Clapperbrook Land and the present-day 'lane' that leads to the allotments. It is marked as the 'House and orchard. Part of Mr Stone's Land'. This leads me to think this was a large 'manor' house and the present-day Alphington Lodge was once the site of a smaller lodge connected with Mr Stone's house.

In 1841 six families were recorded as residents in the lane: Rebecca Wright and family, John Endicott and family, John Guscott and family, Richard Underhill and family, Richard Sutton and family and John Edmunds and family.

Five families were listed in 1851: John Howard, a nurseryman, and family; Thomas Wright, a wheelwright/smith, and family; John Edmunds, a dairyman, and family; and John Endicott, a coal porter, and family.

In 1861 there were six families recorded: John Connett, a gardener, and family; Sarah Endicott; John Selley, an agricultural labourer, and family; John Edmunds, a dairyman, and family; William Heath, an agricultural labourer, and family; John Moxey, a tanners labourer, and family.

Seven families were recorded in 1871: John Howard, an agricultural labourer, and family; John [unreadable], a dairyman, and family; Samuel Crump, a gardener, and family; James Counter, a general labourer, and family; William Earls, a stone mason, and family; John Nicks, a painter and glazier, and family; Elizabeth Ackins.

In 1881 11 families were listed: John Howard, formerly a general labourer, and family; John Lamacroft, formerly a farm labourer, and family; Catherine Rice, a coal merchant, and family; John Bastin, a nursery gardener, and family; Ann Connett, a nurse, and family; Samuel Wills, a market gardener, and family; William Hammett, a garden labourer, and family; John Barrett, a retired shop keeper, and family; Charles Preston, an agricultural labourer; John Nicks, a general labourer, and family; John Jr. Nicks, a painter and glazier, and family.

In 1891 some of the cottages were named: Edmunds Cottage, Samuel Wills, a market gardener, and family; Clapperbrook Cottages, William West, a farmer's labourer, and family; George Davey, an agricultural labourer, and family; Clapperbrook Cottages, George Pate and family; Clapperbrook Cottages, Mary Ann Down and family, John Nicks, an agricultural labourer, William Williams a labourer, and family, John Knott, a mason, and family (one cottage was empty); The Lodge Cottage, Charles Marks, a coachman, groom, and family; John Larracroft; listed under Pixie Cottage, 1. John Woodly, an agricultural labourer, and family; 2. Fred Connett, a gardener, and family; 3. William Harris, a farm labourer, and family.

In 1901 12 families were recorded: Lodge Cottage, Charles Marks, a coachman, groom, and family; Clapperbrook Lane, 1. John Bowles, a carter, and family; 2. Fred Connett, a labourer, and family; 3. William Harris, a labourer, and family; Edward Rowe, a gardener, and family; William Phillips, a labourer, and family; Mitchells Cottages, 1. Edith Black, a laundress, and family; 2. William Avlry?, a railway plate layer, and family; 3. Henry James?, an agricultural labourer, and family; William Preston, a labourer, and family; John Crewe? and family; Balsams Cottage, James Hannaford, a shepherd and family.

In 1911 the families listed were: Sarah Hanaford and family; Part of Tozers, 1. Alfred Wills, market gardener, and family; 2. John Bowles, a general labourer, and family; 3. John Reed Rumbelow, a carter, and family; 4. Frederick Counter, a labourer, and family; 5. William Strong, a carpenter, and family; John Cruse, a general labourer, and family; Thomas Milton, a farm labourer, and family; Henry Densham and his wife; James Finch, a mason's labourer, and family; Henry James, a jobbing gardener, and family; William Preston, a general labourer and family; Charlotte Davey, a charwoman; Lodge Cottage, William Wicketts, a gardener, and family.

In 1946 and 1949 the residents of Tozer's Cottages were listed as: Miss A Stone; Albert Bramton; Misses A. and E. Bowles; Herbert J. Thomas, dairyman; 5. Frederick Counter, bricklayer; Wills, Alfred and Son, market gardeners; Lodge Cottage W. T. Kellaway. Other residents were: W. Westcombe, D. Sinclair, Mrs E. Towell, R. Cowle, R. Steed, Robert Hales. In 1946 Wright, Nichols, Langston and Towell. In 1949 Clapperbrook Cottage Reginald Whilly.

 


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Copyright © Rowena Kirkpatrick