Field Names in the Parish of Alphington

Field names were given to the arable, pasture and orchard plots to identify the field held by the landowner or tenant. These field names could be handed down through many generations while some may have been named for the Tithe Map. Dialect words could have been used in some field names

This page is very much 'a work in progress' and will be added as research continues.

Field Name

Probable meaning of the field name

Alphington Wood

Arable fields, orchards, gardens, copse and furze within or by Alphington Woods

Altar Park

Park means a small enclosure

Anatomy

Apple Pie

Wild plants were often mentioned in field names. In the south Hairy Willow Herb (Epilobium hirsuta) was called Apple Pie

Ash Close

Ash could refer to Ash trees growing in the field. Close means an enclosed field

Back Orchard

Position of orchard in relation to the farm house

Backside

Position of field in relation to the farm house

Ball Park

Ball may come from the name of the estate namely Woodball and Westwood. Park means a small enclosure

Balsom Meadow

Named after Balsom Cottage which was situated in the corner of the field

Barley Arrish

Arrish was southwest English dialect for corn stubble. In Devon the word referred to a corn field which had been cut and cleared

Barn Close

Close means an enclosed field. Barn indicated a barn was situated in the field

Barn Field

Barn indicated a barn was situated in the field

Barn Meadow

Barn indicated a barn was situated in the field

Barns Close

Close means an enclosed field. Barns indicated barns were situated in the field

Bartletts

Named after the house Bartletts

Beacham and Berry

Bean Field

Field where beans were grown

Beefs Leaze

Leaze meant pasture, pasturage, meadow land, common. Perhaps beef cattle grazed in this field.

Beers Piece

Beer was an old village family name. Possibly a field/piece of land rented or owned by the Beer family

Black Hole

Black could refer to dark coloured soil or more frequently it meant that the soil was useless

Blackmore Pool Field

Blackmore was an old village family name. Possibly the Blackmore family owned or rented this field, which contained a small pool

Bliss's Meadow

Bliss is an old village family name

Borough

In English law until 1925 borough referred to a custom where the youngest son of the family inherited land instead of his older brothers. Borough also referred to a medieval fortified group of houses forming a town with special duties and privileges

Borough Orchard

In English law until 1925 borough referred to a custom where the youngest son of the family inherited land instead of his older brothers. Borough also refered to a medieval fortified group of houses forming a town with special duties and privileges

Bottom Beatridge

Bottom refers to the location of the field namely right at the bottom of the farm land. Beat could make a reference to Beating the Bounds where the parish boundaries were marked by striking certain points with rods. This field was right on the boundary of Alphington Parish. In agriculture a ridge was one of a set of raised strips separated by furrows.

Bound Stone Field

Bound Stone refers to the presence of a Parish boundary stone

Bovey

Braggs Field

Bragg was an old village family name. Probably the field was owned or rented by the Bragg family

Brake Close

Brake was taken from the old English word brec that means newly broken land. Close means an enclosed field

Bridge Orchard

Orchard located by Matford Bridge.

Bridge Park

Park means a small enclosure. Field located close to the Alphington Bridge

Broad Meadow

Broad indicates that this was a wide field

Broad Park

Broad indicates that this was a wide field. Park means a small enclosure

Broom Close

Close means an enclosed field

Burrows

Burrow is a hole or tunnel dug by an animal such as a rabbit, burrow is a place of retreat, shelter or refuge

Cabbage Meadow

Field where cabbages were grown

Cartaway

Castle Park

Castle refers to a castle, Iron age fort or a Roman villa being situated close by. Park means a small enclosure

Chalk Field

Field containing chalk

Chambers Park

Park means a small enclosure

Chilleys Field

Chilley was a very old village family name

Churchills

Churchill was a very old village family name

Clapperbrook Field

Field located close to Clapperbrook Lane

Clapper Brook Field

Field located close to Clapperbrook Lane

Clatter Cleave

Cleave means a steep slope (there was also a house called Clattercleave)

Clatter Cleave Brake

Cleave means a steep slope, Brake was taken from the old English word brec which means newly broken land (there was also a house called Clattercleave)

Claylane Field

Field located close to Clay Lane

Clay Lane Orchard

Orchard located close to Clay Lane

Clay Park

Park means a small enclosure. Clay refers to the soil type being clay

Cocky Geo Orchard

Geo could refer to the name George

Coarse Langcombe

Coarse means inferior, rough, loose ground

Coarse Meadow

Coarse means inferior, rough, loose ground

Coblands

Cob is a large type of hazel nut.

Cole Meade

Cole was a very old village family name. Maybe Meade refers to the land being used for the harvest of hay before grass seed became available to purchase. Perhaps Meade referred to drink brewed from honey

Collings Orchard

Collings was a very old village family name. Probably the orchard was rented or owned by the Collings family

Coopers Field

Cooper was a very old village family name. The field was probably rented or owned by the Cooper family

Copse in Broad Park

Copse is an area of trees or dense bushes, a small wood. Park means a small enclosure

Copse in Down

Copse is an area of trees or dense bushes, a small wood. Down menas moorland or elevated rolling grassland

Copse in Gratton

Copse is an area of trees or dense bushes, a small wood. Gratton means a small enclosure

Copse in Gribble Park

Copse is an area of trees or dense bushes, a small wood. Park means a small enclosure

Copse in Ham Ley

Copse is an area of trees or dense bushes, a small wood. Ley was used to describe a piece of land that was put down to grass, clover, etc. for a single season or a limited number of years in contrast to permanent pasture

Copse in Horse Hill

Copse is an area of trees or dense bushes, a small wood. Slopping land used for grazing horses

Copse in Middle Hill

Copse is an area of trees or dense bushes, a small wood. Middle refers to the location of the hill

Copse in Moor Pits

Copse is an area of trees or dense bushes, a small wood. Moor Pits may refer to pits located in the moorland

Copse in Silverland

Copse is an area of trees or dense bushes, a small wood. Silver may refer to Silver Birch trees growing in the copse

Copse in Wine Cellar Orchard

Copse is an area of trees or dense bushes, a small wood. Wine Cellar could refer to a building being used for the storage of wine

Crab Marsh

Marshy land close to Crab Lane

Crablane Field

Field close to Crab Lane

Cridwell

Crooked Langhams

Crooked shaped field

Cross Close

Close means an enclosed field. Cross indicates that this field was close to Alphington Cross

Crosseurs Field

Crossway Close

Crossway could refer to the crossing of Shillinford Hill (Road) and Hangmans Lane. This crossroads was also known as Four Way Cross. Close means an enclosed field

Culverhouse Meadow

Meadow named after Culver House

Dance Field

Perhaps village dances were held in this field

Deptford

Possibly derived from the Anglo-Saxon word for deep ford. The fields that were given this name were located besides streams and in one case a ford was actually marked on a map

Deptfords

Possibly derived from the Anglo-Saxon word for deep ford. The fields that were given this name were located besides streams and in one case a ford was actually marked on a map

Down

Moorland or elevated rolling grassland

Down Close

Down means moorland or elevated rolling grassland. Close means an enclosed field

Ducks Marsh

Named after the marshy area called Ducks Marsh

Dunacliff

East Down

East indicates the field is to the east of the farm house. Down means moorland or elevated rolling grassland

East Close

East indicates the field is to the east of the farm house. Close means an enclosed field

East Meadow

East indicates the meadow is to the east of the farm house

East Worridge

East indicates the field is to the east of the farm house

Eastern Hill

Eastern indicates the hill is to the east of the farm house

Eight Acres

Acre originally means one of the strips of ploughland in a furlong

Elbow Close

Close means an enclosed field. Field was shaped like an elbow

Farther Clay Lane Field

Field located further away from Clay Lane than the other fields

Farther Colands

Farther indicates the location of the field

Farther Cross Park

Park means a small enclosure

Farther Ide Lane Meadow

Farther indicates the meadow is further away from the farm house, the field is named after Ide Lane

Farther Little Meadow

Farther indicates the meadow is further away from the farm house. Little indicates the meadow is small

Farther Orchard

Farther indicates the orchard is further away from the farm house

Farther Wood Marsh

Marshy land further away from the farm house

Farther Venny Rushes

Field is further away from the farm house. Rushes could refer to the rush plant that grows on marsh land or by the waterside. The plants have slender tapering pith-filled stems and are used for covering floors or making chair bottoms and baskets

Feltons

Feltons is possibly derived from old English. Feld meant field which is open land without trees and tun meant enclosure or farm, later it meant fort or town, translated as farm or village in open country

Field

Simply indicates this was a field

Fire Beacon

Field in which a fire beacon was once located

Five Acres

Acre originally means one of the strips of ploughland in a furlong

Fore Door Orchard

Fore means situated in front, Fore Door indicates the orchard was in front of the farm door

Fore Down

Fore means situated in front. Fore Down was situated in front of East Down

Fore Plowridge

Fore means situated in front. Plow refers to Ploughing. In agriculture ridge was one of a set of raised strips separated by furrows

French Close

Close means an enclosed field

French Nut Meadow

A French Nut was a Walnut, possibly this was a meadown with Walnut trees

Fryingpan Field

Could a frying pan have once been found in this field?

Further Langcombe

Field further away from the farm house.

Furze Down

Down covered in Goorse

Glide Orchard

Glue Field

Field where glue was produced

Gratton

Gratton means a small enclosure

Gratton Orchard

Gratton means a small enclosure

Gravel Pit Fields

Fields containing gravel pits

Great Annacliff

Large sized field

Great Bliss Field

Large sized field. Bliss is a very old village name

Great Chronicles

Large sized field

Great Field

Large sied field

Great Furze Close

Close means an enclosed field

Great Gratton

Large sized field. Gratton means a small enclosure

Great Ham Ley Brake

Large sized field. Ley was used to describe a piece of land that was put down to grass, clover, etc. for a single season or a limited number of years in contrast to permanent pasture. Brake was taken from the old English word brec which means newly broken land

Great Hembeer

Large sized field

Great Hollow Pits

Large sized field with pits

Great Horse Hill

Large hill where farm horses were grazed

Great Langcombe

Large sized field

Great Meadow

Large sized meadow

Great Pines Meadow

Large sized meadow with Pine trees

Great Oak Park

Park means a small enclosure

Great Silver Land

Large sized field

Great Smiths Field

Large sized field

Greenway

Gribble Park

Park means a small enclosure

Halses Close

Close means an enclosed field

Ham

Ham meant an encloser, sometimes a house, frequently located near streams

Hangmans Lane Field

Named after the lane, Hangmans Lane, which ran along one side of the field

Haven Close

Close means an enclosed field

Haven Field/Meadow

Field close to Haven Banks

Haven Bridge Field

Field next to Haven Bridge (now known strangely as Salmon Pool Bridge)

Headland

Headland was a strip of land left unploughed at the end of a field

Helmores Field

Helmore was a very old village family name, probably the field was owned or rented by the Helmore family

Higher Alphington Field

Higher Beatridge

Beat could refer to Beating the Bounds where the parish boundaries were marked by striking certain points with rods, this field was right on the edge of the Alphington Parish Boundary. In agriculture ridge was one of a set of raised strips separated by furrows.

Higher Broom Close

Close means an enclosed field

Higher Borough

Higher refers to the location. In English law until 1925 borough referred to a custom where the youngest son of the family inherited land instead of his older brothers. Borough also referred to a medieval fortified group of houses forming a town with special duties and privileges

Higher Down

Higher refers to the location of the moorland/elevated rolling grassland

Higher Halls Wood

Higher refers to the location of the wood

Higher Johns Close

Close means an enclosed field

Higher Kinkham

Higher refers to the location

Higher Moor

Higher refers to the location of the moorland

Higher Orchard

Higher refers to the location of the orchard

Higher Scotland Marshes

Higher refers to the location of the marses

Higher Smallicombe

Higher refers to the location

Higher Stoneland Field

Higher refers to the location of the field

Higher Vinnicombe Lane Field

Higher refers to the location of the field. Named after Vinnicombe Lane

Hill

Field situated on a hill

Hill Orchard

Orchard situated on a hill

Hill Park

Park means a small enclosure

Home Hill

Hill situated close to the farm house

Home Hill Brake

Hill situated close to the farm house. Brake was taken from the old English word brec which means newly broken land

Home Orchard

Orchard situated close to the farm house

Home Worridge

Hookland Garden

A field located at the end of Alphington Parish on a narrow trip of land shaped like a hook

Horns Down

Horsepool Meadow

The Alphin Brook flowed along one side of this field and perhaps at this point it formed a pool where the farm horses could drink

House Close

Field that was close to the house. Close means an enclosed field

Hungrey Acre

Field with poor, barron soil. Acre originally means one of the strips of ploughland in a furlong

Husseys Farther Haven Meadow

Hussey is an old village family name

Husseys Nearer Haven Meadow

Hussey is an old village family name

Ide Lane Meadow

Field named after Ide Lane

Inner Down

One of two fields with Hangmans Lane running along side of the fields, this field was the second one in from the Shillingford Hill Road (see Outer Down)

Inner Field

Joans Field

Field named after Joan

Johns Close Orchard

Close means an enclosed field

Kinkham Meadow

Kitchen Close

Close means an enclosed field

Lamb Park

Field used for grazing lambs. Park means a small enclosure

Landscore

A field whose boundaries were marked by boundary stones instead of an actual fence or wall

Lark Burrow

Lark may well refer to the bird, plant or an amusing incident. Burrow in this field name may imply the existence of a present or former barrow or camp.

Late Coffins

Coffin or Coffyn was a very old village family name

Late Glebe

Previously Glebe land

Late Jacksons

Jackson was an old village family name

Late Lesseurs

Late Springs

Late Strong

Strong was an old village family name

Linhay Orchard

Orchard that contained a farm shed or out building which was open along the front

Little Ash Close

Possilby a small field with Ash trees. Close means an enclosed field

Little Beatridge

Little indicates a smaller sized field. Beat could refer to Beating the Brounds where the Parish boundaries were marked by striking certain points with rods. This field was situsated right at the end of the Alphington Parish Boundary

Little Borough

Small field. In English law until 1925 borough referred to a custom where the youngest son of the family inherited land instead of his older brothers. Borough also referred to a medieval fortified group of houses forming a town with special duties and privileges

Little Clatter Cleave

Cleave means a steep slope. Little indicates a small area

Little Bliss Field

Bliss is a very old village family name

Little Chronicles

Little Ellicombe

Ellicombe could refer to the Rector of Alphington Revd. Ellicombe

Little Ellicombe Copse

Ellicombe could refer to the Rector of Alphington Revd. Ellicombe

Little Field

Small field

Little Field Copse

Copse located in the small field

Little Furze Close

Small area of land with Gorse. Close means an enclosed field

Little Gissam

Little Ham Ley Brake

Ley was used to describe a piece of land that was put down to grass, clover, etc. for a single season or a limited number of years in contrast to permanent pasture. Brake was taken from the old English word brec which means newly broken land

Little Hem Beer

Little Hookland

Little Hollow Pits

Little Horse Hill

Small slopping field where horses were grazed

Little Langcombe

Little Longhams

Little Mare Park

Park means a small enclosure

Little Meadow

Small meadow

Little Middle Marsh

Small marshy field. Middle refers to the location of the field

Little Moor

Small moorland field

Little Oak Park

Park means a small enclosure

Little Orchard

Small orchard

Little Rag

Small field. Rag was a kind of hard coarse stone

Little Scotland

Little Silverland

Little Smith's Field

Long Cellar Orchard

Long indicates a long orchard

Long Close

Long indicates a long field. Close means an enclosed field

Long Down Field

Named after the area Longdown situated in the Parish of Alphington

Long Ellicombe

Long indicates a long field. Possible named after the Rector of Alphington Revd. Ellicombe

Long Furze Close

Long indicates a long Furze. Close means an enclosed field

Long Langcombe

Long indicates a long field.

Long Langhams

Long indicates a long field

Long Mare Park

Long indicates a long field. Mare indicates possibly where the farm Mares were grazed. Park means a small enclosure

Long Meadow

Long refers to the long shape of this field

Long Orchard

Long indicates a long orchard

Long Plowridge

Long indicates a long orchard. Plow refers to Plough. In agriculture ridge was one of a set of raised strips separated by furrows

Longdown Field

Named after the area in Alphington Parish Longdown

Longhams

Lower Alphington Field

Field that was named after the village and was situated between the Shillingfor Hill turn off and Hangmans Lane

Lower Beatridge

Lower referes to the position of the field. Beat could make reference to Beating the Bounds where the Parish boundaries were marked by striking certain points with rods. In agriculture ridge was one of a set of raised strips separated by furrows

Lower Borough

In English law until 1925 borough referred to a custom where the youngest son of the family inherited land instead of his older brothers. Borough also referred to a medieval fortified group of houses forming a town with special duties and privileges

Lower Broom Close

Close means an enclosed field

Lower Down

Lower Elwell's Ground

Lower Meadow

Lower Stoneland Field

Lower Halls Wood

Lower Kinkham

Lower Smallicombe

Lower Vinnicombe Lane Field

Named after Vinnicombe Lane

Maidland End

Mary's Meadow

Field named after Mary

Masters Meadow

Field belonging to the tenants' Master

Matford Lane Field

Named after Matford Lane

Mazzard Park

Park means a small enclosure

Middle Close

Middle refers to the position of the field. Close means an enclosed field

Middle Langcombe

Middle Hill

Middle Marsh

Middle Meadow

Mill Meadow

Meadow belonging to the village mill

Mill Orchard

Orchard belonging to the village mill

Millers Ball

Moor Pits

Monks Land

Field situated on the old site of St Mary's Priory, Marsh Barton

Mow Close

Close means an enclosed field

Mulberries

Field where Mulberries were growing

My Lords Meadow

Field named after the tenants' Lord and master

Nearer Clay Lane Field

Field situated closer to Clay Lane than the other fields

Nearer Colands

Nearer Cross Close

Close means an enclosed field

Nearer Cross Park

Park means a small enclosure

Nearer Ide Lane Field

Field near the farm house named after Ide Lane

Nearer Landscore

Field near the farm house

Nearer Little Meadow

Small meadow near the farm house

Nearer Meadow

Meadow near the farm house

Nearer Venny Rushes

Field nearer to the farm house. Rushes might refer to the rush plant that grew on marshy land or by the waterside. The leaves were slender and tapering and the stems were pith filled. These leaves were used for covering floors or making chair bottoms and baskets

Nearer Wood Marsh

Nearest Langcombe

New Meadow

New field

Nineteen Acres

Acre originally meant one of the strips of ploughland in a furlong

North Plowridge

North refers to the location of the field. Plow refers to Ploughin. In agriculture ridge was one of a set of raised strips separated by furrows

Northmores

Nursery on other side of Turnpike Road

Nursery situated on the side of the Turn Pike Road on the opposite side to the farm house.

Oak Close

Close means an enclosed field

Old Ley Orchard

Ley was used to describe a piece of land that was put down to grass, clover, etc. for a single season or a limited number of years in contrast to permanent pasture

Old Orchard

An old orchard, perhaps the oldest or one of the oldest on the land

Orchard Under the House

Under the House refers to the location of the orchard from the farm house

Outer Down field

Next to Inner Down with Hangmans Lane on one side and the Shillingford Hill Road running alongside the third side

Outer Langcombe

Park Gate

Park means a small enclosure

Parrs Field

Parr was a very old village family name

Parsons Field

Part of Knowle Hill

Field situated on Knowle Hill

Path Marsh

Pear Tree Close

Pear Tree indicates a Pear was in the field or close by. Close means an enclosed field

Penhill

Pit Field

Probably a field with a pit

Pixy Lane Field

Named after Pixy Lane

Plain Close

Plain indicates a level field. Close means an enclosed field

Plain Meadow

Plain indicates a level meadow

Plot in Worldly Pen

Plowridge Copse

Pocombe Bridge Field

Named after Pocombe Bridge

Pocombe Hill

Field on Pocombe Hill

Pompeys

Pook's Folly

Pook is a word derived from an old English pre 7th-Century word 'puca' in middle English 'pook' or 'puck' meaning elf, sprite or goblin. Folly indicates an unusual building in the field at one time

Pound House

Pound House was a mid 17th-Centuary name. It was a building housing an apparatus for pounding or crushing apples; a cider mill. Sometimes other things could be crushed or pulverized.

Pound House Orchard

Pound House was a mid 17th-Centuary name. It was a building housing an apparatus for pounding or crushing apples; a cider mill. Sometimes other things could be crushed or pulverized.

Quarry Close

Quarry indicates a quarry in or near the field. Close means an enclosed field

Ragg

Rag was a kind of hard coarse stone

Reeves Meadow

Reeve was a very old village family name, probably the meadow was rented or owned by the Reeve family

Ridge Close

In agriculture ridge was one of a set of raised strips separated by furrows. Close means an enclosed field

Saint Hills

Named after the house St Hills

Salmon Pool Field

Named after Salmon Pool on the River Exe

Salt Marsh

This field was situated by a stream and could therefore, have been marshy. Salt Marsh is usually a field/marsh that was overflowed by the sea and used as pasture or for collecting water for salt making

Scotland Marshes

Seven Acres

Acre originally meant one of the strips of ploughland in a furlong

Shapp

Sheepwash

Field where the sheep were dipped

Shoulder of Mutton

Shuttlemoor

Silver Meadow

Silverland

Possibly Silver Birch trees were growing on the land

Silverland Copse

Perahps a copse containing Silver Birch trees

Six Acre Langcombe

Acre originally meant one of the strips of ploughland in a furlong

Skinners Land

Skinner was an old village family name, probably the land was rented or owned by the Skinner family

Skinners Marsh

Skinner was an old village family name, probably the marsh land was rented or owned by the Skinner family

Skurlakes

The word lake within a field name indicates a slow flowing stream

Skurlake Orchard

The word lake within a field name indicates a slow flowing stream

Sloe Park

Sloe may indicate Sloes (wild plums) growing in the hedges around the field. Park means a small enclosure

South Field

South indicates the position of the field

Splat Marsh Orchard

Square Acre

Square referes to the shape of the field. Acre originally meant one of the strips of ploughland in a furlong

Stone Hedge Field

Possibly a stone wall surround the field

Stone Lane Garden

Garden named after Stone Lane

Stones Close

Close means an enclosed field

Stooks Field

Stook meant a number of sheaves set upright in a field to dry with their heads together, set up sheaves in stooks

Sun Hill

A sunny field situated on a hill

Sweetland Orchard

Possible an orchard of sweet eating apples, Sweetling was a kind of sweet apple

T Field

Field that was shaped like a capital T

Tan Yard Field

Tapley's Orchard

Tapley was a very old village family name, probably the orchard was rented or owned by the Tapley family

Taws Meadow

Taw means to make hide into leather by soaking in a solution of alum and salt, maybe this was carried out in this meadow

Teaham Meadow

Thorn Close

Close means an enclosed field

Thorny Langcombe

Thorny might indicate a thorny hedge growing around the field.

Three Acres

Acre originally meant one of the strips of ploughland in a furlong

Three Corned Langcombe

Field with three corners

Three Corner Close

Field with three corners. Close means an enclosed field

Twain

Twain means two people or things, or cut in two. This field was situated between the Alphin Brook and Mill Race. The Race was constructed to send water down to Alphington Mills hence cutting the land in two

Two Acres

Acre originally meant one of the strips of ploughland in a furlong

Uncle Dicks Orchard

Field named after one of the tenants or owners Uncle Dick

Under Worridge

Vicarage

Vinnerushes

Could refer to Rushes which were marsh or waterside plants that had slender tapering pith-filled stems. These leaves were used for covering floors or making chair bottoms and baskets

Walk Meadow

Walk Nursery

Walk Orchard

Watery Lane Meadow

Field with Watery Lane running along side it. Watery Lane was the name given to Clapperbrook Lane before the Clapperbridge was built across the Alphin Brook

Way Close

Way was a very old village family name, probably the field was rented or owned by the Way family. Close means an enclosed field

Way Meadow

Way was a very old village family name, probably the meadow was rented or owned by the Way family

Wayre Meadow

Well Park

Park means a small enclosure

West Hill

A hill situated to the west of the farm house

West Orchard

An orchard situated to the west of the farm house

Westwood Meadow

Field named after the Westwood Estate and Farm

Wet Meadow

Field with wet ground

White Close

White might indicate pale soil colour or White Thorn (Hawthorn) growing in the hedges around the field. Close means an enclosed field

White Hill

White might indicate pale soil colour or White Thorn (Hawthorn) growing in the hedges around the hill.

White Well

White might indicate pale soil colour or White Thorn (Hawthorn) growing in the hedges around the field. Well indicates the presence of a well

Wine Cellar

Perhaps indicating the location of a building to store wine

Wine Cellar Orchard

Perhaps indicating the location of a building to store wine in the orchard

Withey Bed

Field where Willows/Withes were grown for producing baskets

Withey Lane Field

Named after Withey Lane

Woodball Field

Named after the estate name of Woodball and Westwood

Woodball Nursery

Named after the estate name of Woodball and Westwood

Woodball Orchard

Named after the estate name of Woodball and Westwood

Woods Field

Field located by woodland

Woolcombe Meadow

Yard

Yard Field

Yonder Headland

Field situated close to edge of the Alphington Parish boundary. Headland was a strip of land left unploughed at the end of a field

 


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